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Lying effects on human health

A lie is a false statement that is presented as if it were true. The practice of communicating lies is called lying, and a person who communicates a lie may be termed a liar.

Lies may be employed to serve a variety of instrumental, interpersonal, or psychological functions for the individuals who use them. Generally, the term “lie” carries a negative connotation, and depending on the context a person who communicates a lie may be subject to social, legal, religious, or criminal sanctions. In certain situations, however, lying is permitted, expected, or even encouraged. Believing and acting on false information can have serious consequences. Therefore, scientists and others have attempted to develop reliable methods for distinguishing lies from true statements

Bad faith

The percent of good faith editors, vandals, spammers, and sock puppets from 2004–2011, out of a random sample of 150–200 new editors per year on Wikipedia

As defined by Sartre, “bad faith” is lying to oneself. Specifically, it is failing to acknowledge one’s own ability to act and determine one’s possibilities, falling back on the determinations of the various historical and current totals which have produced one as if they relieved one of one’s freedom to do so.

Barefaced lies

A barefaced (or bald-faced) lie is one that is obviously a lie to those hearing it. The phrase comes from 17th-century British usage referring to those without facial hair as being seen as acting in an unconcealed or open way. A variation that has been in use almost as long is a bold-faced lie, referring to a lie told with a straight and confident face (hence “bold-faced”), usually with the corresponding tone of voice and emphatic body language of one confidently speaking the truth. Bold-faced lie can also refer to misleading or inaccurate newspaper headlines, but this usage appears to be a more recent appropriation of the term.

From Wikipedia

 

 

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